Quilt Trip

I have a confession to make. Instead of writing, I’ve been stitching for our annual quilt show.

Ode to Joy, Redux

Last year the theme was “Ode to Joy” so I made a quilt with that title. Some months after

Last year's Ode to Joy. You can play the song on the chimes at the bottom . . .hey, hey, hey.

Last year’s Ode to Joy. You can play the song on the chimes at the bottom .

that I heard a PBS story about protests outside of prisons where women sang the Spanish version of “Ode to Joy.”

My quilt would need another layer.

I tried, failed, and gave up trying to locate photos of the event.

But I have a hard time letting go of an idea and the deadline pushed me to look for photos again.

So I looked again. Again no luck finding photos of the event. But other information and leads showed up.

Ode to Joy with next layer

This year’s quilt looks suspiciously like last year’s. There’s a swath of netting with butterflies carrying photos.

Friedrich Schiller originally wrote his poem in 1785 as “Ode to Freedom.” He later changed it to “Ode to Joy” possibly for fear of sounding too political. Beethoven completed his Ninth Symphony in1824.

And then—Wow! Talk about traveling the world. The song was chosen as the Anthem of Europe and the official Anthem of Copa Libertadores de America, the annual football/soccer competition.

Kerry Candaele made a documentary called: Following the Ninth: In the Footsteps of Beethoven’s Final Symphony. You can view a portion of it at the website for Deceptive Cadence: NPR, 1/14/14.

Every year the Ninth is performed in Japan with choirs of as many as 10,000 people.

“Ode to Joy” is used as an anthem for freedom. Students played it in the Tiananmen

Guelaguetza procession

Guelaguetza procession

Square protests of 1989 to drown out the government loudspeakers. A protestor said it gave “a sense of hope and solidarity.”

Renato Alvardo Vital heard it sung when he was a political prisoner under Pinochet. He talked about the hope the music gave him. Poet  Isabel Lipthay called it “a shield against the fear, against the pain, against the darkness.”

But wait, there’s more! But you’ll have to find it.

I couldn’t get permission to use certain photos, but was able to find others that represent some of the impact of this song.

“Ode to Joy (Freedom)” works again with this year’s quilt show theme, “The Sweetest Sound I Ever Heard.”

Photos of Caracas march, Mexico City rally, and 1966 Copa de Libertadores champions

Photos of Caracas march, Mexico City rally, and 1966 Copa de Libertadores champions

Om, Abba, and Hummingbird Fractals

An idea for a “sweetest sound” quilt rattled around my brain but none of my sketches worked. Then the reality of how little time was left struck. (Deadlines are so helpful.)

I have a hard time getting down to just one sweetest sound. Children's voices aren't named, but they're in the quilt too.

I have a hard time getting down to just one sweetest sound. Children’s voices aren’t named, but they’re in the quilt too.

The hummingbird is there because . . . well, I’m a little embarrassed to admit what my brain obsesses about . . . it’s there because for years I’ve tried to figure out how to describe the sound a hummingbird makes. It has always sounded like a spiral to me, but what word to use? I think I’ve finally got it: a sound fractal.

But I only know a little about fractals. So if you know more, please give me feedback about whether this is an accurate way to describe their auditory spiral.

Tablecloth for the group Women Together. There are two quilted panels. Only one is visible in the photo.

Tablecloth for the group Women Together. There are two quilted panels. Only one is visible in the photo.

Pillow Quilt

Back of the quilt using Eric Carle fabrics from his books. The photo of the front came out too blurry.

Back of the quilt using Eric Carle fabrics from his books. The photo of the front came out too blurry.

A recent invitation to a baby shower asked for favorite books to build a fantastic library for the baby. This is my kind of baby shower.

When I was little, I loved the nursery rhyme “Hey, Diddle, Diddle.” I couldn’t fine a copy of The Dish Ran Away with the Spoon (tell you about that book another time) so went with Mother Goose Picture Puzzles by Will Hillenbrand and published in 2011 by Marshall Cavendish. Love the art work, the rebuses, and how he labels some of the items in the illustrations. Plus it includes “Hey, Diddle, Diddle.”
Mother Goose
I used Eric Carle fabrics on the back so had to include one of his books. The Very Lonely Firefly wasn’t in stock, but I was able to get a baby board version of The Very Busy Spider published by Philomel Books!
Carle, spider
And to finish off the books that will go into the quilt pocket: Look, Look! a baby board book by Peter Linenthal, published in 1998 by Dutton’s Children’s Books. The art work uses the black/white contrast that catches a little one’s eye.
BB Look, Look

Pillow quilt folded up into its own pocket and filled with the books.

Pillow quilt folded up into its own pocket and filled with the books.

A

Blatant Brag
(Skip if you’re not in the mood.)

Everything I did this year was made almost completely with scraps and pieces of fabric  already in my stash!!! Only two bolts were harmed in the making of these quilts.

Orchids to the photographers who share their photos. Thank you!

Orchids to the photographers who share their photos. Thank you!

And credit where credit is due. The photographs on the new layer of “Ode to Joy” came from Wikipedia. Thanks for permission to use their photos goes to (from left to right): Zfigueroa, Gisela Ishihara, Revista El Grafico, and Hseldon 10.